Magic Object part 2

But wait there’s more. 

There always sadness when good things must end, and Magic Object is no exception. I was pleased to be able to catch the last of the 2016 Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art, and witness amazing creations at the Anne & Gordon Samstag museum.

This second addition of Magic Object displayed works by Bluey Roberts, Chris Bond, Clare Milledge, Garry Stewart, Juz Kitson, Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran and Tarryn Gill and Danie Mellor.

The exhibition took over two floors, and had a very fun interactive visual piece, which Peter and I couldn’t get enough of.

The first piece that struck me, was what signs “please do not touch” are made for. The work is by Juz Kitson. These beautifully strange pieces were eye catching and mesmerizing. What was so interesting was how the artist was able to create such contrasting textures that seemed almost organic in its form. That would allow the eye to move around and look in deeper into the details.

 

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Ramesh Mario Nithiyendran works are confronting and colourful not only visually, but also in story.

“These influences vie for both victory and ruin in the artist’s composite creations, just as the male and female organs present in the work suggest a transgender realm of new possibilities. Through his work Nithiyendran champions the physicality of the art act, claiming that ‘the visceral, technical possibilities and symbolism of clay (as fundamental corporeal matter) make it the perfect material to engage with the politics of sex, gender and organised religion’.” – Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art 30/05/2016

 

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Chris Bond’s books looked into misguiding the viewer into thinking what they seem to be is truth, where as in reality a book is actually not book, but an object. Placing them into the wall allows intrigue, but also fantasy and play.

Clare Milledge recycling art wanted to create a Hinterglasmalerei affect.

“This technique involves the artist painting onto the reverse side of a pane of glass so that the viewer experiences the image through the glass, while the paint applied is viewed in the reverse order of its application.  This method allows the artist to rework paintings, by either scraping back or adding layers of paint.” – Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art 30/05/2016

Going up stairs onto the next level, we were introduced to Bluey Roberts delicate emu eggs. These creations were turned into an echo of Old Victorian design, however the eggs imprints were of rock art, displaying Australian native floral and fauna.

 

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Tarryn Gill sound sculpture is something to be seen in person. These hand made creatures were custom made, and each provided with their own individual sound. The story behind these creations is base on myths, legends and folktales and even pop culture. I found them to be one of the most interesting piece’s in the museum, something like out of a children book.

Danie Mellor’s blue and white designs are made to create a conversation, or a new thinking into how nature can be perceived. These captured still moments, are like beautiful trances that guide the viewers into rich rain forest and landscapes. Natures own magic.

 

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The last part of the exhibition was by Garry Stewart & Australian Dance Theatre. This interactive piece was ridiculously fun and self motivated. All you needed to do was to stand in front of the screen, move your body, and a number of different affects would surround and altar your movements.

Our movements were slowed down, speed up and even echoed itself on each other. The idea is create realization, that what we do in this world equals an effect, positive or negative. This was something I would recommend to put into schools, a new way of getting children to interact and move together.

 

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Despite being over, the Biennial provided something new, fascinating and different to Adelaide’s cold May month. Most importantly it show cased what Australia had to offer, and not only that, a diversity in culture. Allowing all artist from all walks of life, to be able to show their interest, heritage and background. Till next year.

Thanks for stopping by.

Click onto here to get a full detail of all artist that were on display.

 

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