Discover Magic Object

I wouldn’t describe myself as a art groupie, and I only have two friends who I would consider a real participator in the arts circles of Adelaide, but none the less I am an art appreciator. So when I heard about the Adelaide Biennial of Australian Art was set to grace the floors of the Art Gallery of South Australia, I couldn’t resist but to visit, not once but twice.

Magic Object is the theme of this years biennial and it exhibition does not stop at the Art Gallery of South Australia, but extends to the Anne & Gordon Samtag Museum of Art at the University of South Australia, JamFactory, Carrick Hill and the Santos Museum of Economics.

At the moment I’ve only been able to get to the Art gallery of South Australia exhibition, however I am hoping to waddle down to the other three locations later in the week. The first time I went was with the my Cousin, and the moment you entered the North Terrance entrance of the Art Gallery, you are just welcomed into a room of colour and wonder. The art work is by the very unique and talented Kate Rohde. The colours and patterns were created under black light, and the sculptures are almost too good not to touch, but of course we resisted.  

 

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The rest of the exhibition was held at the back of the gallery up stairs and the basement. On the 2nd floor housed the beautiful and delicate work of the Adelaide based Timothy Horn, Gorgonia 5. Which are blown glass pearls, which are hung from a vertical coral structure. Like every other art work I saw that day, I just wanted to hold it in my hands to feel the weight of it.

 

 

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As we walked through into the next room we came into one of the highlights of the exhibition. It just brought me so much joy looking at each of the pieces and the creativity of the sculptures were beyond.

The work is by Tom Moore and everything is done by glass.

“Made initially as a drawing, and then blown and hot worked in glass, before a perverse reversal into an enormous inflatable plastic sculpture, Planktonic self (2015-16), positioned on North Terrace, signals Moore’s fascination with hybridity and mutation. Elsewhere Moore’s sculptures, like the marvelous metamorphic objects crafted by hand and by nature in the sixteenth century Wunderkammer, appear to be one thing, but are really another. Plant-birds, tree-cars, flaming-pickles and potato-fish confuse the animal, mineral and vegetable. They charm us but also reveal a world at risk.” – Adelaide Biennial 05/2016

There is fun and inquisitiveness as you look at his work, there is also amazement in detail and colours. The exhibition makes you feel like your entering another world, like Alice through the looking glass.  (Which is another thing I am looking forward to)

This is something I would recommend to my friends to go see at the very least, something that needs to be seen and take your time to walk through. Simply a feast for the eyes.

 

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We moved onto two pieces of work, one by Fiona Mcmonagle and the other Gareth Sansom.

Fiona Mcmonagle video piece was displayed on a curved screen, it was presented in soft tones and water colour texture. It carried its viewers through a single still lens of a forest, where people came to dance and cats living lazily in the background. Gareth Sansom paintings were powerful in form and colours, and had a strong presence. There were layers of contrast in subject and sometimes I even wonder what the hell it all means.

 

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Walking down to the basement, we were greeted by hand woven artwork that would spiral down stairs and below. It made us wonder what was coming up next. Antoine and I stopped at the top of the stair and listened in on a touring art group, which were in awe (us included) of the work by Hiromi Tango.

Here is a brief by Adelaide Biennial of Hiromi Tango work.

“Born in Japan, Hiromi Tango is a Tweed Heads, New South Wales based artist who is interested in blending elements of animism, or the belief that inanimate objects are indeed conscious and living, into her performances and practice.  She also uses art as a vehicle to contribute to community and personal wellbeing.  By often inviting others to participate in her practice, Tango aims to heal and regenerate through her work. In Breaking Cycle (Lizard Tail) (2015) Tango references a lizard’s fascinating self-defensive behaviour, where it loses its tail and grows another after experiencing a threat to its life. Having collected objects donated to her by various individuals, including offerings from community members in Derby in Western Australia, Tango, and invited collaborators, have woven them into a large sculptural form to resemble a large lizard’s tail.  In her correspondence with Magic Object Curator Lisa Slade, Tango writes ‘what if we had the power of the lizard to separate parts of ourselves and leave them behind? Could we heal our trauma and regenerate our minds and hearts?’. With its magical talismans and through its cathartic creative process, Tango’s lizard tail is real and alive and is not only a metaphor for the physical act of shedding past pain and experiences but alludes to the wondrous curative properties of art.” – Adelaide biennial 05/2016

 

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The rest of the exhibition shows array of artist, dealing with different mediums.

Roy wiggan rich colour choices with his wool, fur, paints and ochre.

Abdul-Rahman Abdullah beautiful sculpture of and man and his rooster, inspired by his visit to South Sulawesi.

Heather B Swann monster like creatures, that could easy come from an episode of Doctor Who, however I found them so intriguing and beautiful..

Micheal Zavros array of flowers paintings and ornamentation, that could have easily been taken my a digital camera.

Jacqui Stockdale Ned Kelly theme photographs.

Nell twist on a Japanese tomb ornaments.

Glenn Barkley clever ceramics, which impart words which anyone can spend a few moment figuring out what they are.

Loongkoonan beautiful and layered dot paintings.

louise Haselton sculpture pieces that highlight her materials.

Plus many more. All the artist exhibiting in the biannual can be found here on their website.

 

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As we came to the end of the exhibition there was a interactive component. Hiromi Tango story of welcoming participation within her artwork, was encourage. There was a table set up where visitors can come, write their message of calm and wellness, and wrap them up like a lizard tail. After they are done, they are invited to hang their handy work, with fellow visitors and create their own large size lizard tail. Echoing Tango original work.

 

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The exhibition is only open for the rest of this week, so if your in Adelaide hurry quick. There is no entry fee, which is even better. So if you have the time, hop on over.

Thank you for stopping by.

 

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